Monthly Archives: July 2014

the perils of the revival

Recently, a group of my friends and I visited a nearby revival house to watch a screening of The Princess Bride (1987). I seriously misunderestimated the enduring popularity of this film, because when we arrived at the theater, there was a line to the box office that ended somewhere around the back of the building. It was impressive. I do not know why I assumed it would be like any other time I’ve visited there — The Princess Bride is a HUGE cult classic, quoted to this day and so ubiquitous in our pop culture that it’s popularity never fully registered with me. It’s always been one of those movies that just was. Continue reading the perils of the revival

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Link Roundup – The John Ford Blogathon

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We made it! The John Ford Blogathon has reached the end of its run. I would like to once again express my thanks to all the participants and readers throughout the ‘thon, which was a rousing success. Thank you, all! Here below are all the participating posts (over 40 different contributions); if you wrote a piece that is not included below PLEASE leave a comment with a link so I can add it to the roster. Continue reading Link Roundup – The John Ford Blogathon

Criminal Heroes – 3 Bad Men (1926) and Up The River (1930)

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Welcome to the final day (ed. – extended here, apologies) of the John Ford Blogathon, hosted by yours truly and Christianne at Krell Laboratories. At my last count, we had close to 30 separate blog entries from nearly as many different authors; thank you to all our participants and readers this past week! Tomorrow I will collect the full list of contributions into a separate post, for quick reference to anyone who may like a handy link collection, and as usual, there is a roll call at the bottom of today’s post with the most recent contributions.

My final entry looks at two of John Ford’s early films featuring criminals who turn good: 3 Bad Men (1926), an early silent picture; and Up The River (1930), the first feature film for both Spencer Tracy and Humphrey Bogart and the only time the two would collaborate on screen. Continue reading Criminal Heroes – 3 Bad Men (1926) and Up The River (1930)

Suffer the Little Children – Just Pals (1920), Wee Willie Winkie (1937), How Green Was My Valley (1941)

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It’s day 5 of the John Ford Blogathon, which means just a couple more days of fantastic posts from all over the ‘net, celebrating the works of director John Ford. We’ve had so many amazing pieces of writing so far, so please be sure to check out today’s blogroll at the bottom of this piece, which takes a look at three more of Ford’s films, this time featuring children in significant roles: Just Pals (1920), Wee Willie Winkie (1937), and How Green Was My Valley (1941). Continue reading Suffer the Little Children – Just Pals (1920), Wee Willie Winkie (1937), How Green Was My Valley (1941)

Will and Jack – Doctor Bull (1933), Judge Priest (1934), Steamboat Round The Bend (1935)

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Welcome back to the John Ford Blogathon, which is about halfway through its run. I hope you’ve taken the time to read at least some of the contributions; it’s fantastic seeing how many participants Krell Labs and I have so far. Thank you to all the writers who have joined us! Read on for my thoughts on three more of Ford’s films, this time featuring Will Rogers, and more links from around the web…
Continue reading Will and Jack – Doctor Bull (1933), Judge Priest (1934), Steamboat Round The Bend (1935)

A Mother’s Love – Four Sons (1928) and Pilgrimage (1933)

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It’s the John Ford Blogathon, friends! Thank you for being reading along; please be sure to check out the links at the bottom of the post for other participating authors during this week of celebrating one of cinema’s most loved directors. I have a handful of posts for this week, all based around films from the Ford at Fox boxset. For classic film fans, this is an essential addition to the collection, although the sheer physical size of it is a bit intimidating. There are several treasures to uncover right next to time-honored Ford films, and for the most part the set has a high rewatch value. Continue reading A Mother’s Love – Four Sons (1928) and Pilgrimage (1933)